Agenda and minutes

Full Council
Wednesday, 17th October, 2018 7.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - Hammersmith Town Hall. View directions

Contact: Kayode Adewumi  Tel: 020 8753 2499

Items
No. Item

1.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 164 KB

To approve the minutes of the meeting held on 18 July 2018.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Mayor noted the following correction to the minutes:

 

Under Special Motion 8 – Reforming the Council, Councillor Amanda Lloyd-Harris gave her maiden speech.

 

7.02pm – RESOLVED

That, with the correction above, the minutes of the Council meeting held on 18 July 2018 were confirmed as an accurate record and signed by the Mayor.

2.

Apologies for Absence

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors David Morton, Rebecca Harvey, and Sue Macmillan.

 

Apologies for lateness were received from Councillor Ben Coleman.

3.

Mayor's/Chief Executive's Announcements

Minutes:

There were no announcements.

4.

Declarations of Interests

If a Councillor has a disclosable pecuniary interest in a particular item, whether or not it is entered in the Authority’s register of interests, or any other significant interest which they consider should be declared in the public interest, they should declare the existence and, unless it is a sensitive interest as defined in the Member Code of Conduct, the nature of the interest at the commencement of the consideration of that item or as soon as it becomes apparent.

 

At meetings where members of the public are allowed to be in attendance and speak, any Councillor with a disclosable pecuniary interest or other significant interest may also make representations, give evidence or answer questions about the matter.  The Councillor must then withdraw immediately from the meeting before the matter is discussed and any vote taken.

 

Where Members of the public are not allowed to be in attendance and speak, then the Councillor with a disclosable pecuniary interest should withdraw from the meeting whilst the matter is under consideration. Councillors who have declared other significant interests should also withdraw from the meeting if they consider their continued participation in the matter would not be reasonable in the circumstances and may give rise to a perception of a conflict of interest.

 

Councillors are not obliged to withdraw from the meeting where a dispensation to that effect has been obtained from the Audit, Pensions and Standards Committee. 

 

Minutes:

In respect of Special Motion 11 – Calls for a halt to Government funding cuts to the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulhams school’s – Councillors made the following declarations of interest:

 

Councillor Matt Thorley declared non-pecuniary interests as a Director of Brightwells Multi-Academy Trust, the Chair of the Brightwells Finance Committee, and the Chair of Governors at Fulham Primary School. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Colin Aherne declared a non-pecuniary interest as a Governor at Wormholt Park Primary School. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Bora Kwon declared a non-pecuniary interest as a Governor at Flora Gardens Primary School and member of the Finance Committee. She considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Wesley Harcourt declared a non-pecuniary interest as the Chair of Governors at The Good Shepherd RC Primary School. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Alan De’Ath declared a non-pecuniary interest as a Governor at Hurlingham Academy School. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Rory Vaughan declared a non-pecuniary interest as a Governor at St. John’s Catholic Primary School and Chair of the Finance Committee. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Rachel Leighton declared a non-pecuniary interest as a Director at Fulham College Academy Trust. She considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Zarar Qayyum declared a non-pecuniary interest as a School Governor. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Iain Cassidy declared a non-pecuniary interest as a Governor at Melcombe Primary School. He considered that this did not give rise to a perception of a conflict of interests and, in the circumstances it would be reasonable to participate in the discussion and vote thereon.

 

Councillor Sharon Holder declared a non-pecuniary interest as a School Governor. She considered that this did not give rise to  ...  view the full minutes text for item 4.

5.

Items for Discussion/Committee Reports

5.1

Adoption of the Council's Revised Statement of Gambling Policy 2019-2022 pdf icon PDF 120 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

7.05pm – The report and recommendations were formally moved for adoption by the Leader of the Council, Councillor Stephen Cowan.

 

The report and recommendations were then put to the vote:

 

            FOR                            UNANIMOUS

            AGAINST                    0

            NOT VOTING             0

 

The report and recommendations were declared CARRIED.

 

7.05pm – RESOLVED

 

That the revised Statement of Gambling Policy, attached as Appendix 1 to the report, be adopted by the Council.

6.

Special Motions

To consider and determine any Special Motions:

 

Minutes:

Under Standing Order 15(e)(3), Councillor Colin Aherne moved to give precedence to Special Motions 4, 9, 5, 6, and 11 (to give the following order of business – Special Motion 1, 4, 9, 5, 6, 7, 11, 2, 3, 8, then 10). The motion to give precedence was put to the vote.

 

Councillor Alex Karmel moved an amendment to the motion to give precedence for Special Motion 3 to be considered after Special Motion 1. The amendment was then put to the vote:

 

FOR                            10

AGAINST                   30

NOT VOTING             0

 

The amendment to the motion was LOST.

 

The substantive motion was then put to the vote:

 

FOR                            31

AGAINST                    11

NOT VOTING             0

 

The substantive motion was declared CARRIED.

 

7.09pm – RESOLVED

That Special Motions 4, 9, 5, 6, and 11 were given precendence on the agenda. The special motions therefore considered in the following order – Special Motion 1, 4, 9, 5, 6, 7, 11, 2, 3, 8, then 10.

6.1

Special Motion 1 - Happy 70th Birthday NHS pdf icon PDF 75 KB

Minutes:

7.09pm - Councillor Ben Coleman moved, seconded by Councillor Patricia Quigley, the special motion in their names:

 

“This Council celebrates the 70th birthday of our National Health Service and thanks all the millions of NHS workers who have saved the lives and improved the health of the people of Great Britain since 1948.

 

The Council is particularly proud of our local hospitals and healthcare facilities and thanks all our NHS healthcare professionals and staff who work day in, day out to look after the health and wellbeing of people in this part of West London.

 

The Council notes that it is the Council’s formal position to call on the government, the Hammersmith & Fulham Clinical Commissioning Group, NHS North West London and Imperial College NHS Trust to put an end permanently to the Shaping a Healthier Future plan.

 

The Council also notes that, along with Ealing Council, our borough was the first in the country to refuse to sign a Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP) as the closure of Charing Cross and Ealing hospitals was intrinsic to the plan.

 

The Council recognises that since the election of the Labour administration in 2014, the Council has been working with local residents, expert health officials, lawyers and Save Our Hospitals campaigners on an alternative approach to Charing Cross Hospital that will see it improved and safe from closure.

 

The Council agrees that the Labour administration is right to undertake these actions and to fight to save Charing Cross Hospital.

 

The Council notes that a significant and present threat to the health and wellbeing of Hammersmith & Fulham’s residents remains in the form of the Shaping A Healthier Future (SaHF) plan, which was signed off in 2013 by Jeremy Hunt MP (Con), the then Secretary of State for Health.

 

The Council notes that SaHF’s plan for Charing Cross Hospital proposes to:

 

·         Demolish the current Charing Cross Hospital

·         Sell off most the Charing Cross Hospital site

·         Replace the current hospital with a series of clinics on a site no more than 13% the size of the current hospital

·         Re-brand the clinics as a “local hospital”

·         Replace the current A&E with an Urgent Care Clinic

·         Re-brand the Urgent Care Clinic a "Class 3 A&E"

·         Lose more than 300 and possibly all of the acute care beds.

 

The Council notes that in February 2013 the former Conservative administration left the cross-party campaign to oppose SaHF and the demolition of Charing Cross Hospital. It recalls that Conservative councillors did that following talks with government and local health officials. Not only did these talks not include cross-party Labour councillors or any residents from the local Save Our Hospitals campaign, Conservative councillors did not even inform these campaign partners that they were having such discussions.

 

The Council notes that, on unilaterally leaving the cross-party campaign, the then Conservative administration chose to change the Council’s position to support the SaHF proposals without any prior public scrutiny in the relevant Scrutiny Committee of what this change would actually mean for  ...  view the full minutes text for item 6.1

6.4

Special Motion 4 - Censure of the Rt Hon Greg Hands MP on his changed position on Brexit pdf icon PDF 53 KB

Minutes:

7.48pm – Councillor Alan De’Ath moved, seconded by Councillor Asif Siddique, the special motion in their names:

 

“The Council agrees that Brexit is the biggest and most long-lasting change facing our borough, our country and our continent at this historic moment so it is incumbent on all our elected representatives to properly represent the views and needs of our constituents and our great country.

 

It is therefore a matter of regret that the Council votes to censure the Rt Hon Greg Hands MP for his increasingly damaging position on Britain’s exit from the European Union, which is strongly at odds with the vast majority of his constituents.

 

The Council notes that in the June 2016 referendum, voters in the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham voted Remain by 70 per cent. Similarly, voters in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea voted Remain by 69 per cent.

 

The Council understands that the country narrowly voted differently but recognises that nobody in the country voted for the chaos that has plagued the government’s negotiations with the EU and its broader approach to Brexit ever since. The Council notes that the government is itself publishing warnings that Brexit will seriously threaten the strength of the British economy and wellbeing of its citizens across the UK.

 

The Council recognises that, as an International Trade minister, Greg Hands MP was party to and partly responsible for the government’s botched approach and the resulting chaos.

 

The Council regrets Greg Hands MP’s ill-judged attack on the Electoral Commission for sanctioning the Vote Leave campaign – publishing two articles which undermine the statutory authorities responsible for guaranteeing the safety and integrity of UK elections. The Council agrees that Mr Hands’ articles rightly earned him a public rebuttal from the Electoral Commission.

 

The Council is dismayed that, in September 2018, Greg Hands MP supported the Institute of Economic Affair’s proposal for a Free Trade Agreement with the EU and notes this would necessitate border controls between the EU and UK. This would devastate the UK’s manufacturing sector, much of which is integrated into “just-in-time” supply chains stretching across EU Member States, and it would necessitate a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Short of ‘no deal’ this is the harshest and most economically damaging form of Brexit and is the furthest removed from what the people of Chelsea and Fulham voted for.

 

Furthermore, the form of Brexit now championed by Greg Hands MP fails to protect the service sector, which makes up 80% of the UK economy and employs many of Greg Hands MP’s constituents. Many constituents are already being informed that their jobs are being relocated to Frankfurt, Paris or Dublin in order to remain within the Single Market and retain financial services passporting rights. House prices are falling as people relocate.

 

The Council notes that Greg Hands MP called for any future trade deal to sweep away existing Rules of Origin designations thus undermining food safety and quality standards at home and undermining  ...  view the full minutes text for item 6.4

6.9

Special Motion 9 - Conservative Mayoral Candidate pdf icon PDF 38 KB

Minutes:

8.48pm – The special motion was withdrawn.

6.5

Special Motion 5 - Standing against Islamophobia pdf icon PDF 41 KB

Minutes:

8.49pm – Councillor Lucy Richardson moved, seconded by Councillor Wesley Harcourt, the special motion in their names:

 

“This Council condemns all forms Islamophobia. It recognises that the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham is fortunate enough to have many Muslim citizens and pledges to continue to stand by them against this disgusting racism.

 

The Council calls on all in public life to promote unity and recognises that senior politicians have a particular responsibility to do that. It therefore regrets the remarks of the Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP who compared women in burqas to “letterboxes” and “bank robbers.” The Council agrees with Baroness Sayeeda Warsi that Boris Johnson was engaging in dangerous “dog-whistle” Islamophobia and calls on Boris Johnson to apologise and take all necessary measures and training to ensure he does not say or do anything that is racist again.

 

The Council calls for the forthcoming London mayoral election campaign to be conducted without using Islamophobic and racially divisive language.”

 

Speeches on the special motion were made by Councillors Lucy Richardson, Wesley Harcourt, Alan De’Ath, Bora Kwon, Stephen Cowan, and Lisa Homan (for the Administration) – and Councillors Andrew Brown and Frances Stainton (for the Opposition).

 

Councillor Lucy Richardson then made a speech winding up the debate before the special motion was then put to the vote:

 

FOR                            UNANIMOUS

AGAINST                   0

NOT VOTING            0

 

9.19pm – RESOLVED

 

This Council condemns all forms Islamophobia. It recognises that the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham is fortunate enough to have many Muslim citizens and pledges to continue to stand by them against this disgusting racism.

 

The Council calls on all in public life to promote unity and recognises that senior politicians have a particular responsibility to do that. It therefore regrets the remarks of the Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP who compared women in burqas to “letterboxes” and “bank robbers.” The Council agrees with Baroness Sayeeda Warsi that Boris Johnson was engaging in dangerous “dog-whistle” Islamophobia and calls on Boris Johnson to apologise and take all necessary measures and training to ensure he does not say or do anything that is racist again.

 

The Council calls for the forthcoming London mayoral election campaign to be conducted without using Islamophobic and racially divisive language.

6.6

Special Motion 6 - Standing against antisemitism and the adoption of International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism pdf icon PDF 70 KB

Minutes:

9.20pm – Councillor Sue Fennimore moved, seconded by Councillor Max Schmid, the special motion in their names.

 

“This Council reaffirms its robust approach to firmly standing against antisemitism in all its forms across the borough and elsewhere.

 

We therefore welcome the Government’s announcement on 12 December 2016, supported by the Official Opposition, that the UK will sign up to the internationally recognised International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) guidelines on antisemitism, which define antisemitism thus:

 

Antisemitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.

 

Manifestations might include the targeting of the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity. However, criticism of Israel similar to that leveled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic. Antisemitism frequently charges Jews with conspiring to harm humanity, and it is often used to blame Jews for “why things go wrong.” It is expressed in speech, writing, visual forms and action, and employs sinister stereotypes and negative character traits.

 

Contemporary examples of antisemitism in public life, the media, schools, the workplace, and in the religious sphere could, taking into account the overall context, include, but are not limited to:

·         Calling for, aiding, or justifying the killing or harming of Jews in the name of a radical ideology or an extremist view of religion.

·         Making mendacious, dehumanizing, demonizing, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions.

·         Accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.

·         Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust).

·         Accusing the Jews as a people, or Israel as a state, of inventing or exaggerating the Holocaust.

·         Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations.

·         Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour.

·         Applying double standards by requiring of it a behaviour not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation.

·         Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g., claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterize Israel or Israelis.

·         Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.

·         Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel.

 

This Council adopts in full the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's definition of antisemitism as set out above and pledges to continue its strong combative approach against this  ...  view the full minutes text for item 6.6

6.7

Special Motion 7 - Charter Against Modern Slavery pdf icon PDF 44 KB

Minutes:

9.34pm – Councillor Sue Fennimore moved, seconded by Councillor Max Schmid (standing in for Councillor Sue Macmillan), the special motion in their names.

 

“This Council supports the Charter Against Modern Slavery.

 

It will....

1.         Train its corporate procurement team to understand modern slavery through the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply’s (CIPS) online course on Ethical Procurement and Supply.

2.         Require its contractors to comply fully with the Modern Slavery Act 2015, wherever it applies, with contract termination as a potential sanction for non-compliance.

3.         Challenge any abnormally low-cost tenders to ensure they do not rely upon the potential contractor practising modern slavery.

4.         Highlight to its suppliers that contracted workers are free to join a trade union and are not to be treated unfairly for belonging to one.

5.         Publicise its whistle-blowing system for staff to blow the whistle on any suspected examples of modern slavery.

6.         Require its tendered contractors to adopt a whistle-blowing policy which enables their staff to blow the whistle on any suspected examples of modern slavery.

7.         Review its contractual spending regularly to identify any potential issues with modern slavery.

8.         Highlight for its suppliers any risks identified concerning modern slavery and refer them to the relevant agencies to be addressed.

9.         Refer for investigation via the National Crime Agency’s national referral mechanism any of its contractors identified as a cause for concern regarding modern slavery.

10.       Report publicly on the implementation of this policy annually.”

 

Speeches on the special motion were made by Councillors Sue Fennimore and Max Schmid (for the Administration) – and Councillor Matt Thorley (for the Opposition). Councillor Sue Fennimore made a speech winding up the debate before the special motion was put to the vote:

 

FOR                            UNANIMOUS

AGAINST                   0

NOT VOTING            0

 

The special motion was declared CARRIED.

 

9.41pm – RESOLVED

 

This Council supports the Charter Against Modern Slavery.

 

It will....

1.         Train its corporate procurement team to understand modern slavery through the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply’s (CIPS) online course on Ethical Procurement and Supply.

2.         Require its contractors to comply fully with the Modern Slavery Act 2015, wherever it applies, with contract termination as a potential sanction for non-compliance.

3.         Challenge any abnormally low-cost tenders to ensure they do not rely upon the potential contractor practising modern slavery.

4.         Highlight to its suppliers that contracted workers are free to join a trade union and are not to be treated unfairly for belonging to one.

5.         Publicise its whistle-blowing system for staff to blow the whistle on any suspected examples of modern slavery.

6.         Require its tendered contractors to adopt a whistle-blowing policy which enables their staff to blow the whistle on any suspected examples of modern slavery.

7.         Review its contractual spending regularly to identify any potential issues with modern slavery.

8.         Highlight for its suppliers any risks identified concerning modern slavery and refer them to the relevant agencies to be addressed.

9.         Refer for investigation via the National Crime Agency’s national referral mechanism any  ...  view the full minutes text for item 6.7

6.11

Special Motion 11 - Calls for a halt to government funding cuts to the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham’s schools pdf icon PDF 37 KB

Minutes:

9.41pm – Councillor Larry Culhane moved, seconded by Councillor Alan De’Ath, the special motion in their names.

 

“This Council is alarmed by the consequences to our borough’s children of the ongoing government cuts to the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham’s schools and calls on the Government to reverse its approach and immediately rectify this.”

 

Speeches on the special motion were made by Councillors Larry Culhane, Alan De’Ath, and Andrew Jones (for the Administration) – and Councillor Mark Loveday (for the Opposition). Councillor Larry Culhane then made a speech winding up the debate before the special motion was put to the vote:

 

FOR                            UNANIMOUS

AGAINST                    0

NOT VOTING             0

 

The special motion was declared CARRIED.

 

10.02pm – RESOLVED

 

This Council is alarmed by the consequences to our borough’s children of the ongoing government cuts to the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham’s schools and calls on the Government to reverse its approach and immediately rectify this.

 

Guillotine

The Mayor noted that the guillotine had fallen and informed the Council that the remaining special motions and reports would be considered moved and seconded and would be voted on in order.

6.2

Special Motion 2 - RingGo and the New Visitor Permit pdf icon PDF 41 KB

Minutes:

10.02pm – The special motion was withdrawn.

6.3

Special Motion 3 - Lannoy and Hartopp pdf icon PDF 37 KB

Minutes:

10.02pm – The special motion was withdrawn.

6.8

Special Motion 8 - Disabled Access to Tube Stations pdf icon PDF 39 KB

Minutes:

10.02pm – The special motion was withdrawn.

6.10

Special Motion 10 - Council Housing Borrowing Cap pdf icon PDF 39 KB

Minutes:

10.02pm – The special motion was withdrawn.

7.

Information Reports - To Note

Minutes:

There were no information reports to this meeting of the Council.

 

 

* * * * *   CONCLUSION OF BUSINESS    * * * * *

 

7.1

Annual Report of the Chair of the Audit, Pensions and Standards Committee - 2017-18 pdf icon PDF 153 KB

Minutes:

10.03pm – RESOLVED

 

The report was noted.